Accessible educational materials: Using audio in the classroom

print access tagulWhy use audio in the classroom?

A few reasons…

  • Audio is an alternate option to print-providing increased access to the curriculum for students who have linguistic strengths.
  • Audio allows students to listen at their own pace, independently, and without distractions.
  • Teachers and students can create instructional materials and tutorials.
  • Other uses: podcasts, interviews, and practicing reading fluency

Here are some recommendations and ideas for audio tools to support two principles of UDL, representation and expression;

  1. Insert an audio file into a Word document. (Under the insert menu).Screenshot 2016-02-03 15.08.24
  2. On a Mac, use the already installed Quicktime player to record audio, then embed that file into a word document.
  3. Check out SoundCloud or Voice Recorder Chrome apps for recording on a Chromebook, then upload to Google Drive. You can also use web-based tools (see below).
  4. In Windows on a PC, use Sound Recorder to record audio.
  5. For longer recordings, use recording apps like Dropvox (uploads  your recording straight into Dropbox) or Voice Memos (free and already built into iOS devices, no need to download).
  6. Use super-easy web tools like Vocaroo to record audio online. The app sends you a link to send via email or post onto a webpage.
  7. If you or your students have access to Microsoft Office online, you have access to OneNote, their note taking application. You can insert an audio file into OneNote easily.
  8. For bigger projects like podcasts, students can use cross-platform web-based tools like Audacity, or apps that use multi-media such as Podomatic or Voicethread. Just be sure to be aware of the “social media” component to some of these podcasting apps.
  9. For multimedia projects such as digital storytelling, apps such as Book Creator or Adobe Voice are great options. Check out Avi Spector’s (RECIT FGA Regional Service) excellent post on using Adobe voice in the adult education classroom.

 

 

 

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